Posts tagged to 'Adaptive philanthropy'

Four ways family philanthropies can support social movements

Posted by Derrick Feldmann on March 29, 2016

Social movements are at the core of who we are as a society. People participate in these social movements because those who can’t stand up for themselves need the voice of strangers to be there for them. It’s the real reason most of us get behind a cause – an inspirational story, a symbol or a vision inspired us.

The 5 Dysfunctions of Philanthropy

Posted by Kris Putnam-Walkerly on January 6, 2016

In 2002, Patrick Lencioni wrote a book called, "The Five Dysfunctions of a Team." It explains the interpersonal aspects of teambuilding in a professional setting and how they undermine success. Although Lencioni’s team is in a fictional company, his lessons also are entirely relevant to grantmakers. We're pleased to share this recent blog post from NCFP Content Partner Putnam Consulting Group on five common dysfunctions that can affect philanthropy generally - and family philanthropy specifically.

Stone Soup: Community based advocacy at the William Caspar Graustein Memorial Fund

Posted by Lauren Hasey Maher on February 26, 2014

A Conversation with Nancy Leonard, David Nee, and Carmen Siberon of the William Caspar Graustein Memorial Fund on Community Based Advocacy Children and storytelling have always been at the heart of the William Caspar Graustein Memorial Fund. It is only fitting that one of their most successful...

The value of transparency

Posted by National Center for Family Philanthropy on December 20, 2013

"In the world of philanthropy, people are either going to trust us and see us as a transparent, honest broker or they're not. And if we demonstrate transparency and honesty along the way, we tend to get that back. And if we don't, we tend not to get that back."  --Rachel Monroe, President, Harry and...

Giving while living: Wallis Annenberg and Leonard Aube

Posted by National Center for Family Philanthropy on May 15, 2013

Editor’s Note: The National Center is delighted to partner in 2013 with the Bridgespan Group to feature videos from its Conversations with Remarkable Givers series. For our May edition in this series, we share Bridgespan’s interview with Wallis Annenberg, board chair, and Leonard Aube, executive...

Living with your failures

Posted by National Center for Family Philanthropy on April 25, 2013

"Most people are making grants that are a year, two years, three years, five years, and we've committed for the long term, to be here until we go out of business. It's an unusual approach but we recognize that community change takes a long time. And you need to be able to take the risk of doing that...

Can a small organization have a big impact?

Posted by Emily Tow Jackson on April 15, 2013

I get asked this question often.  How can a small foundation with few staff really catalyze large scale social change?  In fact, how can a foundation of any size play this role?  At The Tow Foundation, we have attempted to play a significant role in juvenile justice reform, an issue that seems like an...

The Ansara family fund: Partnering beyond border for long-term impact

Posted by Jason C. Born on April 15, 2010

When Karen and Jim Ansara contacted the Boston Foundation on January 14, 2010 to talk about how their family’s donor advised fund could best respond to the earthquakes in Haiti – which had happened less than 48 hours before – they were continuing both a longstanding commitment to international...

Real estate: The grant that keeps on giving

Posted by Elaine Gast Fawcett on April 15, 2009

“At a time like this, we need to stop investing in treasuries and bonds and start investing directly in our communities.” —Tom Parker, Hutton Foundation As a family fund these days, you might feel like crawling into a corner and licking your endowment losses. But look on the bright side....

Families step up to meet the economic crisis

Posted by Joseph Foote on January 15, 2009

On a sunny Sunday in November, 2008, the board of the Durfee Foundation gathered in the 48-year-old foundation’s office in Santa Monica, California. The trustees already knew that the foundation’s assets of approximately $30 million had fallen 30 percent. The talk before the meeting focused on the...

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