Posts tagged to 'Collaboration'

How Can I Be 1% More?

Posted by June Wilson and Philanthropy Northwest on March 27, 2017

"I believe that Quixote Foundation’s reflective practices allowed us to hold multiple truths while engaging in internal and often uncomfortable racial equity training. Our ability to do this work at every level of the organization made a tremendous difference in our final year of grantmaking and grantee engagement."

"Change Happens at the Speed of Trust"

Posted by Patrick Troska on March 13, 2017

We knew we had to change the dynamic. We began by changing how we show up as individuals and as an institution.

Donor Collaboratives: Maximizing Your Philanthropic Impact

Posted by Rachel Ogorek on February 22, 2017

NCFP’s 2015 Trends in Family Philanthropy study found that more than 90 percent of respondents cited the “impact of their giving” as the top motivation for their participation in family philanthropy. This same study found that just 45 percent of family foundations participate in efforts with other funders. If grant makers are interested in increasing the impact of their giving, they should give serious consideration to participating in a donor collaborative.

5 Things Funders Can Do to Address the Global Refugee Crisis

Posted by Regine A. Webster on January 19, 2017

As the world faces one of the largest refugee crises since World War II, understanding how to fund effective solutions has proven to be a difficult, complex task.

Success Like This Could Hit the Small Time: Replicating a Global Philanthropic Networking Model in Detroit

Posted by Douglas Bitonti Stewart on November 18, 2016

We usually think of scale as an escalator that moves in only one direction: up. Things start small and local and, if they succeed, they grow to be large and global. Sometimes scale can work in reverse — by taking a global idea or model and giving it a new application on the local level.

Hey Foundation Trustees, Come Get a Beer With Us

Posted by Vu Le on October 17, 2016

We nonprofits work with program officers, and despite many of them being really nice and down-to-earth people, the power differential can make them intimidating and scary. This is how we nonprofit professionals imagine a meeting of (even scarier) foundation trustees:

It’s Time for Grantmakers to Embrace Failure

Posted by Katherine Lorenz on October 5, 2016

Philanthropy often encourages grantees to take risks, to be innovative, to find new solutions to old problems. Indeed, many refer to philanthropy as “risk capital,” providing funding that can help society create innovative, new models for addressing the world’s most intractable social issues. But risk and innovation often bring an uncomfortable consequence: failure.

Looking for the Helpers

Posted by Virginia Esposito on September 7, 2016

My moments of reassurance come when a family funder tells me about a grant or project they’ve launched to restore and reinvigorate community. Often, these are efforts to ameliorate suffering but also to get at root circumstances and causes

Gratitude and humility in philanthropy; from a story, to a value, to action

Posted by Douglas Bitonti Stewart and Julie Fisher Cummings on September 6, 2016

The importance of documenting the ethos of our founders is well known in family philanthropy. Authors and leaders throughout the field have published articles and tools (e.g. Grandparent Legacy Project) aimed to help families ask questions to elicit the core values of our founders. These values are the backbone of our work. And when we are able to connect our founders’ values to real-life stories, it can have a profound impact on our families and those we serve.

The Parklands Project: A place-based project from the C.E. & S. Foundation

Posted by Daniel H. Jones on July 31, 2016

What if our generation aspired to create what our predecessors had by getting out ahead of the growth of our city and creating a new system of parks that would inject new life into Louisville’s neighborhoods? As a second-generation trustee of my family’s foundation, the C. E. & S. Foundation, I knew I had access to a resource that could help answer this important question.

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