Posts tagged to 'Creative grantmaking'

It’s Time for Grantmakers to Embrace Failure

Posted by Katherine Lorenz on October 5, 2016

Philanthropy often encourages grantees to take risks, to be innovative, to find new solutions to old problems. Indeed, many refer to philanthropy as “risk capital,” providing funding that can help society create innovative, new models for addressing the world’s most intractable social issues. But risk and innovation often bring an uncomfortable consequence: failure.

Looking for the Helpers

Posted by Virginia Esposito on September 7, 2016

My moments of reassurance come when a family funder tells me about a grant or project they’ve launched to restore and reinvigorate community. Often, these are efforts to ameliorate suffering but also to get at root circumstances and causes

The Parklands Project: A place-based project from the C.E. & S. Foundation

Posted by Daniel H. Jones on July 31, 2016

What if our generation aspired to create what our predecessors had by getting out ahead of the growth of our city and creating a new system of parks that would inject new life into Louisville’s neighborhoods? As a second-generation trustee of my family’s foundation, the C. E. & S. Foundation, I knew I had access to a resource that could help answer this important question.

GEO's Change Incubator

Posted by Lori Bartczak on July 18, 2016

GEO’s Change Incubator is designed to help grantmakers strengthen relationships with their grantees in a way that leads to better impact. While GEO’s participating teams are still in the early stages of this work, they have started sharing some of what they are learning and how these lessons can be...

Why investing in media is critical to successful advocacy

Posted by Arabella Advisors and Shelley Whelpton on July 12, 2016

Three experts explain why, and how, funders should integrate smart communications into their broader advocacy strategies to maximize results.

Junior board in action: The Guadalupe and Lilia Martinez Foundation

Posted by Brendan Adams and Youth Philanthropy Connect on July 11, 2016

NCFP just returned from Youth Philanthropy Connect's (YPC) annual conference where we presented on our 2015 Trends Study in Family Philanthropy study. One of the members of the YPC leadership team, Brendan Adams, is featured below. Brendan and his cousin Nadia make up the Junior Board at the Guadalupe...

A change in family dynamics signals a shift away from place-based giving

Posted by Virginia Esposito on July 4, 2016

Today’s philanthropists, however, are likely to be less connected to place. The modern economy is built less on geography and more on technology – and many of those who are earning wealth are doing so in a global marketplace.

Not just cute faces: Youth grantmakers are strengthening philanthropy

Posted by Jen Bokoff on June 27, 2016

The stereotype of the “me me me” generation couldn’t be more wrong. Youth are driving grant dollars to organizations that are changing communities through more than 480 programs around the world. Most of these young people are not independently wealthy, and most didn’t say “philanthropist” when asked what they wanted to be when they grew up.

Failure talks with TPW: A conversation with Sapphira Goradia

Posted by Devon Cohn, Sapphira Goradia and The Philanthropy Workshop on June 14, 2016

This is the first in a series of conversations with members of The Philanthropy Workshop curated by TPW member Devon Cohn. "TPW Talks Failure" examines stories about lessons learned, about the process of failing, and cautionary tales that shine a light into less explored areas or less well understood areas of the philanthropic world. This is a transcript of an interview with Sapphira Goradia, Executive Driector of The Goradia Foundation, which has been edited for clarity.

5 questions to help you align your giving values and practices

Posted by Virginia Esposito on June 1, 2016

Today, the practice of philanthropy is under continuous review – and not just by our critics or those who look suspiciously at big endowments. Those who want the very best for our field and the greatest impact for our work are also looking beyond why we give to examine the how.

Back to top