Posts tagged to 'Systems change'

Looking for the Helpers

Posted by Virginia Esposito on September 7, 2016

My moments of reassurance come when a family funder tells me about a grant or project they’ve launched to restore and reinvigorate community. Often, these are efforts to ameliorate suffering but also to get at root circumstances and causes

A change in family dynamics signals a shift away from place-based giving

Posted by Virginia Esposito on July 4, 2016

Today’s philanthropists, however, are likely to be less connected to place. The modern economy is built less on geography and more on technology – and many of those who are earning wealth are doing so in a global marketplace.

The Noyce Foundation: Ten core principles for hands-on philanthropy

Posted by The Noyce Foundation on April 1, 2016

The Noyce Foundation was established in 1990 by the family of the late physicist, inventor, and computer industry pioneer Dr. Robert N. Noyce, co-founder of Fairchild Semiconductor and Intel, and co-inventor of the integrated circuit, better known as the microchip. For the past quarter-century, the Noyce Foundation has been devoted to helping the nation’s students become “curious, thoughtful, and engaged” learners in the fields of mathematics and science. Over its quarter century of existence, the Noyce Foundation’s approach to grant making evolved reflecting what the trustees have learned from their cumulative experiences as well as the institutional knowledge the foundation has gained about the fields it in which it works.

Good governance: How should family foundation boards spend their time?

Posted by Phillip Henderson on February 9, 2016

Checks landing in the mailboxes of nonprofit organizations with foundation return ad-dresses have long been considered philanthropy’s most important currency. Reflecting that view, family foundations have tended to focus their operations, self-image, and their very reasons for being on getting the dollars out the door...Lurking behind that 90 percent, though, is another story—it’s the natural tendency to conflate family governance of a foundation and strategic control of its mission with control of the grantmaking function.

Rethinking the funding equation: Can general operating support become the new normal?

Posted by Jen Teunon on January 26, 2016

If every funder only pays for a specific program or a specific line item, an organization becomes fragmented and unstable. Without general operating support, an organization doesn’t have the money for staffing, rent, technology, training, or even the phone bill. And, without a strong infrastructure, programs that improve our communities can’t happen.

Can't Not Do: The Social Drive That Changes the World

Posted by Paul Shoemaker on September 24, 2015

"I can’t not do this. It’s not that I can do this, it’s that I can’t not. I don’t have time to not make an impact. I could not imagine not..." I don’t remember the first time I heard someone use one of these grammatically incorrect phrases. But I hear these statements consistently, to this day, from educated and literate people. I know you have heard of “can-do” people, they are eager and willing, we admire them and hope our children become like them when they grow up. But the regular heroes you will meet in this book go way beyond can-do, they can’t not do.

Leveraging social sector leadership: Opportunities for family philanthropy

Posted by Lori Bartczak and Nora Silver on September 24, 2015

While the connection between strong leadership and effective organizations may seem obvious, navigating the variety of ways grantmakers can support leadership can seem overwhelming. In GEO’s recent publication, Leveraging Social Sector Leadership, the authors present research that lifts up what social sector leaders say they need to be successful and how grantmakers can support those needs.

Planning for an influx of assets

Posted by Elaine Gast Fawcett on August 25, 2015

An influx of assets is a powerful transition point in your family’s philanthropy. With rising resources comes the budding potential to do more of what you’re already doing – or, perhaps, to try something new. Either way, additional resources will often provide your foundation with new options for making a difference according to your foundation’s mission.

Narrow and Deep

Posted by Jay Ruderman on June 25, 2015

I was once told that “when you’ve seen one foundation, you’ve seen one foundation.” Every foundation, public or private, is different. Each foundation is passionate about the issues they support but the way they “do business” differs vastly. Some foundations solicit applications, distribute funds and this is the extent of their involvement. Others are very private about their funding while some are very public. Since I became President of the Ruderman Family Foundation, I have pursued a path of going “narrow and deep” for the main issue we advocate for: the inclusion of people with disabilities in our society. Twenty percent of the U.S. population has some form of disability and it’s the only minority group almost all of us are guaranteed of joining at some point in our lives...

Stone Soup: Community based advocacy at the William Caspar Graustein Memorial Fund

Posted by Lauren Hasey Maher on February 26, 2014

A Conversation with Nancy Leonard, David Nee, and Carmen Siberon of the William Caspar Graustein Memorial Fund on Community Based Advocacy Children and storytelling have always been at the heart of the William Caspar Graustein Memorial Fund. It is only fitting that one of their most successful...

Back to top