Posts tagged to 'Taking risks'

Lessons from the Orfalea Foundation sunset

Posted by Catherine Brozowski and Lois Mitchell on April 1, 2016

In 2000, The Orfalea Foundation was started in Santa Barbara, California. The foundation carried forward the same entrepreneurial spirit of the business through its philanthropy. Orfalea’s legacy stands for bold and at times even aggressive approaches to helping alleviate some of the pressing social problems in Santa, Barbara, including early childhood education, school nutrition, and disaster preparedness. The foundation engaged in deep working partnerships, comprehensive initiatives, and transformative impact in the community because we believed that through partnerships we could tackle big challenges facing our neighborhoods.

Four ways family philanthropies can support social movements

Posted by Derrick Feldmann on March 29, 2016

Social movements are at the core of who we are as a society. People participate in these social movements because those who can’t stand up for themselves need the voice of strangers to be there for them. It’s the real reason most of us get behind a cause – an inspirational story, a symbol or a vision inspired us.

Rethinking the funding equation: Can general operating support become the new normal?

Posted by Jen Teunon on January 26, 2016

If every funder only pays for a specific program or a specific line item, an organization becomes fragmented and unstable. Without general operating support, an organization doesn’t have the money for staffing, rent, technology, training, or even the phone bill. And, without a strong infrastructure, programs that improve our communities can’t happen.

The 5 Dysfunctions of Philanthropy

Posted by Kris Putnam-Walkerly on January 6, 2016

In 2002, Patrick Lencioni wrote a book called, "The Five Dysfunctions of a Team." It explains the interpersonal aspects of teambuilding in a professional setting and how they undermine success. Although Lencioni’s team is in a fictional company, his lessons also are entirely relevant to grantmakers. We're pleased to share this recent blog post from NCFP Content Partner Putnam Consulting Group on five common dysfunctions that can affect philanthropy generally - and family philanthropy specifically.

The best mistake we ever made: Jessie Smith Noyes Foundation

Posted by Kathleen Odne , Karen Green and Jenifer Getz on October 28, 2015

A sure-fire indicator that we all make mistakes was the capacity crowd at the National Forum on Family Philanthropy workshop in Seattle entitled, “The Best Mistakes We Ever Made.” Using a rapid-fire format, each of ten speakers took three minutes to share a mistake they made in their family philanthropy experience. To set the context, each speaker explained the goal and framework by responding to, “What were you trying to do”? Next they explained, “What happened that was unexpected – in other words, what went wrong?” Finally, and most importantly, we asked the mistake-makers to share, “What did you learn from your mistake?” In other words, how did the foundation changes its practices as a result?

Can't Not Do: The Social Drive That Changes the World

Posted by Paul Shoemaker on September 24, 2015

"I can’t not do this. It’s not that I can do this, it’s that I can’t not. I don’t have time to not make an impact. I could not imagine not..." I don’t remember the first time I heard someone use one of these grammatically incorrect phrases. But I hear these statements consistently, to this day, from educated and literate people. I know you have heard of “can-do” people, they are eager and willing, we admire them and hope our children become like them when they grow up. But the regular heroes you will meet in this book go way beyond can-do, they can’t not do.

Expanding your comfort zone: Managing risk

Posted by John Bare on September 24, 2015

As I sit here writing about risk, the date at the bottom of my laptop screen – September 11 – is a jarring reminder that risk analysis is both futile and indispensable. It’s futile if we use risk analysis to predict the future. Or come to believe that the act of reflection itself inoculates us against harm. So goes the temptation: Now that we have completed this risk analysis, what could go wrong?

Leveraging social sector leadership: Opportunities for family philanthropy

Posted by Lori Bartczak and Nora Silver on September 24, 2015

While the connection between strong leadership and effective organizations may seem obvious, navigating the variety of ways grantmakers can support leadership can seem overwhelming. In GEO’s recent publication, Leveraging Social Sector Leadership, the authors present research that lifts up what social sector leaders say they need to be successful and how grantmakers can support those needs.

Do you have event ideas for foundations and nonprofits to network with one another?

Posted by National Center for Family Philanthropy on February 25, 2015

This month we are delighted to feature a question recently prompted by a Friend of the National Center for Family Philanthropy. We decided to take this question to our LinkedIn Family Philanthropy Network. If you are interested in a great additional support system for your family philanthropy, we suggest you join our LinkedIn network!

What is mission investing and is it different from impact investing?

Posted by Mission Investors Exchange on October 17, 2014

Mission investments are made by foundations and other mission-based organizations to further their philanthropic goals. Mission investments (like impact investments) are intended and designed to generate both a measurable social or environmental benefit and a financial return.

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