Posts tagged to 'Effectiveness and assessment'

Giving In The New Year: A Novel Approach To Sharing Power

Posted by Lisa Ranghelli on January 28, 2019

Lisa Ranghelli of the National Committee for Responsive Philanthropy argues that confronting the role of power in perpetuating disparities leads to true progress in health, housing, education, criminal justice and every other major societal issue.

Census 2020: Your Family Foundation Needs to Engage

Posted by Maggie Osborn on January 18, 2019

Maggie Osborn of United Philanthropy Forum gives practical advice about how foundations can approach Census 2020.

Nothing Should Keep Us from Listening

Posted by Lindsay Louie on March 13, 2018

CEP’s new report, Staying Connected: How Five Foundations Understand Those They Seek to Help, profiles five foundations that rank among the top 15 percent of foundations that commissioned a Grantee Perception Report (GPR) between 2016 and 2017. My biggest takeaway from this research? Nothing should keep us from listening!

How to Walk the Talk When You’re Walking with Others

Posted by Victor Gongora on February 14, 2018

PEAK Grantmaking has been taking a look at how grantmakers can better align their grantmaking practices to their values through our Walk the Talk initiative.

GrantAdvisor.org: Why All The Cool People Are Using It

Posted by Vu Le on September 7, 2017

GrantAdvisor.org is like TripAdvisor or Yelp, but for reviewing foundations. Anyone can provide a review, and when a foundation has five reviews, its profile will go live so everyone can see all the reviews. It’ll help foundations to get no-BS feedback and advice that they might not be able to get otherwise.

How Aggravating is Your Grantmaking Process? Use this Checklist to Find Out!

Posted by Vu Le on June 19, 2017

As we roll into 2017, there have been lots of articles about how philanthropy must adapt. Let’s take care of a few logistical things foundations do that make nonprofits want to roll up a printed-out copy of our tax filings and beat themselves unconscious. Funders: Please go through this list one item at a time. Then have a conversation with your team about what things you can do to improve your score.

GEO's Change Incubator

Posted by Lori Bartczak on July 18, 2016

GEO’s Change Incubator is designed to help grantmakers strengthen relationships with their grantees in a way that leads to better impact. While GEO’s participating teams are still in the early stages of this work, they have started sharing some of what they are learning and how these lessons can be...

Failure talks with TPW: A conversation with Sapphira Goradia

Posted by Devon Cohn, Sapphira Goradia and The Philanthropy Workshop on June 14, 2016

This is the first in a series of conversations with members of The Philanthropy Workshop curated by TPW member Devon Cohn. "TPW Talks Failure" examines stories about lessons learned, about the process of failing, and cautionary tales that shine a light into less explored areas or less well understood areas of the philanthropic world. This is a transcript of an interview with Sapphira Goradia, Executive Driector of The Goradia Foundation, which has been edited for clarity.

Good governance: How should family foundation boards spend their time?

Posted by Phillip Henderson on February 9, 2016

Checks landing in the mailboxes of nonprofit organizations with foundation return ad-dresses have long been considered philanthropy’s most important currency. Reflecting that view, family foundations have tended to focus their operations, self-image, and their very reasons for being on getting the dollars out the door...Lurking behind that 90 percent, though, is another story—it’s the natural tendency to conflate family governance of a foundation and strategic control of its mission with control of the grantmaking function.

Expanding your comfort zone: Managing risk

Posted by John Bare on September 24, 2015

As I sit here writing about risk, the date at the bottom of my laptop screen – September 11 – is a jarring reminder that risk analysis is both futile and indispensable. It’s futile if we use risk analysis to predict the future. Or come to believe that the act of reflection itself inoculates us against harm. So goes the temptation: Now that we have completed this risk analysis, what could go wrong?

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