Posts tagged to 'Board decision-making'

The role of trust on family philanthropy boards

Posted on March 24, 2014

“We had to step back to take the time and to invest in a process to build trust on the board and a culture that allowed us to work together. Trust is the lubricant that makes everything else possible. Without that, nothing else works.” John Flicker, Trustee, The Storer Foundation Source: March NCFP...

A letter to funders considering support of Typhoon Haiyan: A sprint, a marathon, and a decathlon

Posted by Regine A. Webster on December 15, 2013

Editor’s Note: This piece originally appeared on the Center for Disaster Philanthropy website on November 13th. We are pleased to re-publish it with permission here; as referenced in the article, the advice and perspectives shared here are as meaningful today as they were a month ago....

Getting started with impact investing: Overcoming resistance from family and board members

Posted by Julia Balandina Jaquier on November 15, 2012

Editor’s Note: Impact investing is of growing interest to the many thousands of philanthropic families around the world who manage their philanthropy through family foundations and family offices. In this month’s edition of Family Giving News, we present practical solutions and advice regarding one of...

Family members as staff

Posted by National Center for Family Philanthropy on November 15, 2010

What is the best way to formalize the process of hiring and setting salary for a family member? LIZ WALTERS: Off the top of my head, I can think of four things that we did. The first thing was to create job descriptions. I was the only staff member to begin with, but we also created a job description...

Family involvement: The spectrum of options

Posted by Alice Buhl on October 15, 2010

Kelin Gersick’s book, Generations of Giving: Leadership and Continuity in Family Foundations, outlines the patterns most often seen in family philanthropy. In the first generation the donor has the strongest involvement and control. In the second generation more family members become involved and by...

Emeritus board members: Curse or blessing?

Posted by Alice Buhl on August 15, 2010

Mom and Dad are aging but we want to keep them involved. Aunt Sally has been running the foundation forever but the other board members feel it is time for someone else to take over. Uncle John is beginning to get confused. The three sisters in the second generation have been controlling things for...

Family board meetings

Posted by National Center for Family Philanthropy on June 15, 2009

Q: Our board meetings have become very frustrating. We have differences because of family history as well as a couple of dominant personalities. The result is lengthy, unproductive meetings that sometimes become personal. How can we turn this situation around and get on with the foundation’s business?...

Governance as leadership in tough times

Posted by Alice Buhl on April 15, 2009

For many foundations, establishing the payout level has become fairly perfunctory. The staff or accountants do the math and the foundation pays out the 5% required by law. However, I have worked with foundations that struggle to balance their desires to solve the problems of today and to protect assets...

The William J. and Dorothy K. O’Neill foundation

Posted by Susan Crites Price on January 17, 2009

Lessons from One Family’s Transition from Founder to Nonfamily Director When Bill O’Neill Jr., president of the William J. and Dorothy K. O’Neill Foundation in Cleveland, decided to step aside from being “chief cook and bottle washer for 20 years,” the family faced a common dilemma: how to shift the...

Ethics in Family Philanthropy: Putting Shared Values to Work

Posted by Sarah Trzepacz on January 15, 2005

There are times when philanthropy is in the news for all the wrong reasons: stories of scandal and abuse garnering as much attention, if not more, than tales of valuable philanthropic contributions. Despite unfavorable press coverage and eroding public confidence in the nonprofit sector, things are not...

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