Posts tagged to 'Ethics'

Even with complex histories, families have an opportunity to advance equity

Posted by David Neal on May 3, 2016

Racial diversity and inclusion have been central to the grant making strategy at the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation for decades. In more recent years, the Foundation has deepened its engagement with racial equity. For David L. Neal, a family member and trustee at the Winston-Salem, N.C., family foundation, this focus on equity has been a high priority. Not long ago, however, as he was researching his family’s — and the foundation’s — history, he discovered that its legacy is more complicated than he had once thought.

Four ways family philanthropies can support social movements

Posted by Derrick Feldmann on March 29, 2016

Social movements are at the core of who we are as a society. People participate in these social movements because those who can’t stand up for themselves need the voice of strangers to be there for them. It’s the real reason most of us get behind a cause – an inspirational story, a symbol or a vision inspired us.

A journey with young philanthropists from the Andrus family: Working with the next gen to animate the principles of social justice

Posted by Alyson Wise on August 25, 2015

On a sunny summer Saturday morning, seven college-aged youth trickled into a collaboration space at the offices of the Surdna Foundation and the Andrus Family Fund to commence the yearlong Board Executives in Training Program (BETS). The organization’s commitment to this work was a long-standing pursuit of the Andrus Family Philanthropy Program (AFPP); for almost fifteen years, it had implemented innovative, inclusive, and flexible programing to engage family members of all ages and interests to get involved in the family’s philanthropies and in public service. BETS itself, had been facilitated previously for four cohorts of youth interested in learning more about the sector and the family legacy.

Ethics and family philanthropy

Posted by Michael Rion on August 25, 2015

“The most important ethical thing you're doing is making a commitment to philanthropy.” -- Michael Rion, Ph.D, Founder and recently retired as Principal of Resources for Ethics and Management

What's next for the Ford Foundation?

Posted by Darren Walker on July 23, 2015

Last fall, when I wrote about my first year on the job, I asked you all to do something that would be very helpful to me: Tell me the truth. That simple request drew more than 2,000 e-mails to my inbox. Some of them were profound and insightful. Others, lighthearted. But all of them were truthful. And I couldn’t be more grateful. In reading and reflecting on each and every response, I have become more aware of the ways in which we can improve our institution, and serve our mission. Indeed, these last 20-some months have been a transformative journey. Throughout, I have been challenged and humbled. In some cases, my beliefs were affirmed. In others, my assumptions were completely upended. In every instance, your constructive, and sometimes provocative, ideas have stirred, stimulated, and inspired.

Admitting Failure: Learning from mistakes in philanthropy

Posted by Bob Giloth on June 25, 2015

I was recently invited to speak about mistakes and learning in philanthropy at the Grants Managers Network's annual conference. My talk and panel presentation argued that admitting failures contributes to high-quality implementation, innovation of new strategies and improved governance and transparency. It’s good medicine that doesn’t always taste so good. Yet despite increasing philanthropic interest in mistakes and learning, many foundation staff still find it difficult to have conversations about mistakes...

Curtis Meadows on "doing the right thing"

Posted on May 25, 2013

"I would remind all trustees that the public interest is always in the room with them at board and governance meetings.  Unseen but watching are the representatives of that public interest: the IRS, Attorney General, Congress,  press and potential beneficiaries. Expectantly they look to us to do the...

What is a disqualified person?

Posted by Benjamin T. White on May 15, 2013

Self-dealing is defined to include almost all business and financial transactions between a private foundation and its “disqualified persons.” So what is exactly is a disqualified person? The following is excerpted from the National Center for Family Philanthropy’s Passages Issue Brief, “Avoiding...

Ethics in Family Philanthropy: Putting Shared Values to Work

Posted by Sarah Trzepacz on January 15, 2005

There are times when philanthropy is in the news for all the wrong reasons: stories of scandal and abuse garnering as much attention, if not more, than tales of valuable philanthropic contributions. Despite unfavorable press coverage and eroding public confidence in the nonprofit sector, things are not...

Ethical Wills and Donor Legacy Statements: Passing on More Than Financial Wealth

Posted by National Center for Family Philanthropy on April 15, 2004

This issue of Family Giving News examines the growing use of ethical wills and donor legacy statements: What are they? Why might you and your family want to use one? And how can one of these statements benefit individual donors, their families and the causes and issues they care most about?...

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