Posts tagged to 'Family culture'

Motivation for giving

Posted by Lauren Amos on June 25, 2015

"My mom, growing up, always told me that to whom much is given, much is expected. That [saying] really resonated with me, so I wanted to give back to the community in which I lived in." - Lauren Amos, fund advisor, Wish Foundation Fund of the Community Foundation for Greater Atlanta

Why is it important to have an internal mission that is separate and distinct from an external mission?

This month we are delighted to feature a question recently asked in our May webinar, Balancing internal vs. external missions in family philanthropy. This in-depth conversation on successful strategies for thoughtfully defining, measuring, and tracking both internal and external missions in family foundation features Julie Fisher Cummings and Doug Bitonti Stewart from the Max M. and Marjorie S. Fisher Foundation and Linda Tracy from the Tracy Family Foundation.

Four lessons for effectively engaging youth

Posted by Daniel Horgan on April 22, 2015

I remember my first summer volunteering at the age of 12 for my local YMCA summer camp. Being the youngest of three and seeing my older siblings head off to work each day as camp counselors, I was determined to get in on the action and not be left at home alone. I managed to convince the camp director to let me join the team as a volunteer that supported activities for the 6 year olds. That experience, coupled with many others including serving as a youth representative on a national board and launching a nonprofit at the age of 18, opened my eyes to a number of key lessons on how to effectively engage youth as volunteers, partners, and problem solvers.

Establishing a Day of Caring to build engagement

Posted by Bryn Mars on March 25, 2015

One of the hardest things for any family, but especially a family of wealth, to accomplish is engaging multiple generations in a meaningful way. I’m convinced that one of the best ways to do that is through shared Philanthropy.

Avoiding avoidance: Addressing and managing conflict in family philanthropy

Posted by Elaine Gast Fawcett on December 15, 2014

Conflict is normal in any family or organization. Yet, many of us avoid conflicts, even if that avoidance affects relationships or how the foundation operates. This month in FGN we feature Part 2 of a two-part series excerpted from our forthcoming Passages Issue Brief on “Avoiding avoidance.” In Part 1 we introduced the nature of conflict and some of the most common conflicts in family philanthropy. In this month's issue we share a variety of healthy tools for calling out and addressing conflict in a healthy, productive way, along with suggestions for when outside help may be needed.

Avoiding avoidance: Addressing and managing conflict in family philanthropy

Posted by Elaine Gast Fawcett on November 18, 2014

Conflict is normal in any family or organization. Yet, many of us avoid conflicts, even if that avoidance affects relationships or how the foundation operates. This month in FGN we feature Part 1 of a two-part series excerpted from our forthcoming Passages Issue Brief on “Avoiding avoidance.” In Part 1 we’ll introduce the nature of conflict and some of the most common conflicts in family philanthropy. Next month, in Part 2, we will share creative “tactics” boards use to perpetuate the avoidance, and how you can use simple tools to call out and address conflict in a healthy, productive way.

'On-boarding' the next gen: The Durfee Foundation's approach

Posted by Caroline Avery on October 20, 2014

The Durfee Foundation has held many board retreats during its 54-year history, but these have always been for trustees only. In 2014 we decided to do an all-family board retreat and bring together toddlers, teens, trustees and elders. Why the change? Read on...

Susan Packard Orr on the legacy of her parents, David and Lucile Packard

Posted by Susan Packard Orr and Cole Wilbur on May 28, 2014

Editor’s note: the following is reprinted from Living the Legacy: The Value of a Family’s Philanthropy Across Generations, published by the National Center for Family Philanthropy in 1999. In a family foundation there is no question as to the importance of learning from the donors and carrying out...

Four critical elements for generational succession

Posted by Virginia Esposito on February 26, 2014

Dear FGN Readers: The National Center for Family Philanthropy fields hundreds of questions about family giving over the phone, through email, and in person every year.  Thousands more use the Family Philanthropy Online Knowledge Center to search for answers on their own in the thousands of articles,...

Philanthropy Meets the "Always On" Generation

Posted by Susan Crites Price on October 15, 2013

Family and community foundations that want to engage youth in grantmaking need to adapt to  a new generation of kids, many of whom have already gone digital with their philanthropy. Dubbed the “Always On” Generation, today’s young people have discovered they can do good in the world without going...

Back to top