Posts tagged to 'Family values'

Gratitude and humility in philanthropy; from a story, to a value, to action

Posted by Douglas Bitonti Stewart and Julie Fisher Cummings on September 6, 2016

The importance of documenting the ethos of our founders is well known in family philanthropy. Authors and leaders throughout the field have published articles and tools (e.g. Grandparent Legacy Project) aimed to help families ask questions to elicit the core values of our founders. These values are the backbone of our work. And when we are able to connect our founders’ values to real-life stories, it can have a profound impact on our families and those we serve.

Celebrating black philanthropy month and our collective history

Posted by Yvonne L. Moore on August 10, 2016

Philanthropy in this country did not begin with the creation of institutions established by oil and steel magnates, or with savvy investors. The origins and forms are numerous, but for me—a Black woman in America—philanthropy is ancient, personal, inter-generationally nurtured, and, quite honestly, expected.

A change in family dynamics signals a shift away from place-based giving

Posted by Virginia Esposito on July 4, 2016

Today’s philanthropists, however, are likely to be less connected to place. The modern economy is built less on geography and more on technology – and many of those who are earning wealth are doing so in a global marketplace.

Giving as a family: My family's use of a donor-advised fund through our community foundation

Posted by Rosie Abriam on June 21, 2016

A donor-advised fund (DAF) provides the donor(s) the opportunity to provide a tax-deductible gift to benefit the organizations and issues that the donor(s) care about most. Working with the community foundation has been great for our family because they provide management and support including handling the paperwork attendant to tax-deductions.

Helping others embrace the American dream: The A.C. Ratshesky Foundation celebrates 100 years

Posted by Judy Sneath on June 9, 2016

To celebrate his 50th birthday, a Boston-area banker named Abraham "Cap" Ratshesky chose to give a gift to his community by setting aside some of his wealth to create a foundation. A century later, that giving continues.

The world belongs to our children

Posted by Alan Fox on May 17, 2016

We live in a world of growing income disparities, human rights violations, increasing environmental concerns, political instability and ongoing global threats and atrocities. We will never have an impact on these issues until we enlist the help of those who will be 60 years old in 2071. Yes, I’m talking about the five-year-olds of today.

Expanding your comfort zone: 5 windows into risk in family philanthropy (Passages excerpt)

Posted by Tony Macklin on May 5, 2016

Philanthropy is often described as society’s “risk capital.” Our generosity can support causes and ideas that business and government agencies cannot or will not. We can use our resources to inspire new ideas, challenge existing thinking, or continue supporting an organization when others won’t. However, the idea of risk in philanthropy quickly muddies as we direct our generosity through a family foundation, donor-advised fund, or other collective effort. Our ideas about and tolerance for risk diverge, shaped by individual, family branch, professional, and other experiences.

Even with complex histories, families have an opportunity to advance equity

Posted by David Neal on May 3, 2016

Racial diversity and inclusion have been central to the grant making strategy at the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation for decades. In more recent years, the Foundation has deepened its engagement with racial equity. For David L. Neal, a family member and trustee at the Winston-Salem, N.C., family foundation, this focus on equity has been a high priority. Not long ago, however, as he was researching his family’s — and the foundation’s — history, he discovered that its legacy is more complicated than he had once thought.

Giving circles: A tool for engaging youth in giving

Posted by Huong Nguyen- Yap on April 29, 2016

We often hear that young people are the leaders of tomorrow. But what if we started to think about them and support them to be leaders today? What does that mean and how would it look? Philanthropy gives us an opportunity to work with youth on developing life skills such as decision-making, collaboration and, more importantly, empowering youth as leaders in their communities. Engaging youth in philanthropy gives them the ability to make decisions that impact their lives, their communities, and society as a whole.

10 questions to help start the values conversation

Posted by Suzanne Hammer on April 21, 2016

The way to fulfillment in philanthropy—and by and large as a family—is the degree to which you are driven by purpose and shared values. In other words, why you give matters just as much, if not more, than what you give. Whether you are talking about preserving wealth or giving it away, it’s important to be clear on the family and individual values that drive that decision. Yet, how many people have voiced their own values, less held a conversation with loved ones about the values they share? My guess? Not many.

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