Posts tagged to 'Succession'

'On-boarding' the next gen: The Durfee Foundation's approach

Posted by Caroline Avery on October 20, 2014

The Durfee Foundation has held many board retreats during its 54-year history, but these have always been for trustees only. In 2014 we decided to do an all-family board retreat and bring together toddlers, teens, trustees and elders. Why the change? Read on...

The circle of philanthropy

Posted by Lauren Hasey Maher on August 18, 2014

There is an ever increasing commitment among families to be intentional about exposing the next generation and including them in their philanthropy. The recent Nexus Global Youth Summit showcased a number of truly innovative ways that participants were harnessing their professional skills to make an impact on an issue they care about, while doing it in collaboration with others.

How do we prepare young adults for involvement in our family’s philanthropy?

Posted by National Center for Family Philanthropy on July 29, 2014

There are many strategies for teaching young adults about family philanthropy, and preparing them to become involved. Here we share NCFP's special new slideshow providing several suggestions for families thinking about how to build and engage a new generation of philanthropic leadership.

Weaving a web in action

Posted by Annie Hernandez and Katie Marcus Reker on July 29, 2014

When two family foundations met in the summer of 2010 to allow their engaged youth to connect with and learn from one another, we never would have predicted what would come out of it. It was these two foundations along with two others that launched, Youth Philanthropy Connect, a project of the Frieda C....

Can you recommend a short video on family foundation board responsibilities?

Posted by National Center for Family Philanthropy on June 22, 2014

As a matter of fact, we can! We're pleased to share our new video, "So you want to be a family foundation board member," created especially for teenagers and young adults in search of a quick and lighthearted introduction to the many responsibilities of being a family foundation board member:     Also...

The next generation reinvigorates philanthropy

Posted by Mark Larimer on May 28, 2014

One of the most important trends people were talking about at the National Forum on Family Philanthropy was the engagement and involvement of youth (ages 8+) during the grantmaking process. In many ways, it represents the future of grantmaking and how the younger generation’s view of philanthropy will...

Four critical elements for generational succession

Posted by Virginia Esposito on February 26, 2014

Dear FGN Readers: The National Center for Family Philanthropy fields hundreds of questions about family giving over the phone, through email, and in person every year.  Thousands more use the Family Philanthropy Online Knowledge Center to search for answers on their own in the thousands of articles,...

A legacy lives on: The Kaplan Family Foundation’s successful leadership transition

Posted by Dinaz Mansuri and Mollie Bunis on December 15, 2013

Editor’s note: As the National Center for Family Philanthropy continues its ongoing focus on the topic of transitions, this month in Family Giving News we feature an excerpt from “A Legacy Lives On: The Kaplan Family Foundation’s Successful Leadership Transition,” the new Passages Issue Brief on the...

The Tracy Family Foundation on next gen boards

Posted by Tracy Family Foundation on August 15, 2013

The National Center for Family Philanthropy and Youth Philanthropy Connect, a program of the Frieda C. Fox Foundation, have teamed up on the release of our latest Passages Issue Brief entitled, “Igniting the Spark: Creating Effective Next Generation Boards.” This month’s Voices from the Field column...

Being a (next gen) leader

Posted by National Center for Family Philanthropy on July 25, 2013

"I have learned a lot about how to be a leader; this means learning how to set goals and deadlines and meet them, what to do when you don't, how to work patiently with other people, how to ask for what you want without being demanding, what it means to run a meeting (create bylaws, appoint a secretary...

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