Posts tagged to 'Board transitions'

From Family Philanthropy to a Legacy Foundation

Posted by Barbara Hostetter on July 3, 2018

Barr Foundation's co-founder and chair discusses expanding the Foundation’s Board of Trustees.

Three Takeaways From The Trustee Education Institute: Reflections From A Young Trustee

Posted by Jackie Hendrickson on December 27, 2017

"We shared what we learned about board legalities, evaluation tools, and how we came to start thinking of our new roles in the foundation."

Boardroom battles: 5 ways to move beyond conflict

Posted by Kris Putnam-Walkerly on May 31, 2016

Most board members are rational, committed professionals. However, even among the most collegial boards there's always the possibility of conflict, and savvy foundation leaders I know have used the following approaches to diffuse disagreement smoothly and quickly.

The world belongs to our children

Posted by Alan Fox on May 17, 2016

We live in a world of growing income disparities, human rights violations, increasing environmental concerns, political instability and ongoing global threats and atrocities. We will never have an impact on these issues until we enlist the help of those who will be 60 years old in 2071. Yes, I’m talking about the five-year-olds of today.

10 mistakes new foundation boards make, and how to avoid them

Posted by Kris Putnam-Walkerly on March 24, 2016

While some new foundation boards may be made up of veteran philanthropists, it's a safe wager that many of those entrusted are taking on the job for the first time. It's a big responsibility, and many of the early choices made by a new board can determine whether the new foundation will move forward smoothly and effectively or become mired in a culture or in policies that stifle effectiveness.

Adding non-family board members: Q&A with Penelope McPhee of the Arthur M. Blank Family Foundation

Posted by National Center for Family Philanthropy on February 2, 2016

When the Arthur M. Blank Family Foundation added four non-family members to its board, it wanted to bring new perspectives into its meetings, while also promoting the integrity and values of the family and the foundation.

How can I help my fellow board members understand the ethical implications of our board make-up and selection process?

Posted by Michael Rion on July 23, 2015

This month we are pleased to feature answers to two of the many questions asked during our December 2014 webinar with Andrew Schulz of Arabella Advisors covering the topic of "What are the rules for donors, family members, and staff of family foundations in terms of accepting tickets to events?"

As our family grows, how do we decide who gets to participate in the philanthropy?

Posted by National Center for Family Philanthropy on June 25, 2015

As our philanthropic family grows more diverse and distinct – as well as more geographically distant from the roots of the founders – how do we decide who should participate in the family’s philanthropy and how they will participate?

Having new eyes: Transitions in family philanthropy

Posted by Virginia Esposito on February 25, 2015

For more than two years, I have been researching, interviewing, and thinking about transitions in the life of a family philanthropy. I’ve listened to anyone willing to talk to me about their experiences with philanthropic transitions. Occasionally, I have been on the road speaking about my early findings and impressions. I am delighted that my paper, Family Philanthropy Transitions: Possibilities, Problems, and Potential, is the newest addition to our Passages Issue Brief series and can be found in the Family Philanthropy Online Knowledge Center

Avoiding avoidance: Addressing and managing conflict in family philanthropy

Posted by Elaine Gast Fawcett on December 15, 2014

Conflict is normal in any family or organization. Yet, many of us avoid conflicts, even if that avoidance affects relationships or how the foundation operates. This month in FGN we feature Part 2 of a two-part series excerpted from our forthcoming Passages Issue Brief on “Avoiding avoidance.” In Part 1 we introduced the nature of conflict and some of the most common conflicts in family philanthropy. In this month's issue we share a variety of healthy tools for calling out and addressing conflict in a healthy, productive way, along with suggestions for when outside help may be needed.

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