Posts tagged to 'Board training and orientation'

Three Takeaways From The Trustee Education Institute: Reflections From A Young Trustee

Posted by Jackie Hendrickson on December 27, 2017

"We shared what we learned about board legalities, evaluation tools, and how we came to start thinking of our new roles in the foundation."

Why Your Board Chair Needs a Job Description

Posted by Virginia Esposito on February 2, 2017

Successful family foundation board chairs are able to both drive action and manage egos — and are often the difference between a foundation deftly navigating challenging situations and being tripped up by them.

Boardroom battles: 5 ways to move beyond conflict

Posted by Kris Putnam-Walkerly on May 31, 2016

Most board members are rational, committed professionals. However, even among the most collegial boards there's always the possibility of conflict, and savvy foundation leaders I know have used the following approaches to diffuse disagreement smoothly and quickly.

10 questions to help start the values conversation

Posted by Suzanne Hammer on April 21, 2016

The way to fulfillment in philanthropy—and by and large as a family—is the degree to which you are driven by purpose and shared values. In other words, why you give matters just as much, if not more, than what you give. Whether you are talking about preserving wealth or giving it away, it’s important to be clear on the family and individual values that drive that decision. Yet, how many people have voiced their own values, less held a conversation with loved ones about the values they share? My guess? Not many.

10 mistakes new foundation boards make, and how to avoid them

Posted by Kris Putnam-Walkerly on March 24, 2016

While some new foundation boards may be made up of veteran philanthropists, it's a safe wager that many of those entrusted are taking on the job for the first time. It's a big responsibility, and many of the early choices made by a new board can determine whether the new foundation will move forward smoothly and effectively or become mired in a culture or in policies that stifle effectiveness.

Generations Together: Tools for teaching the next generation to give

Posted by Virginia Esposito on March 1, 2016

According to the National Center for Family Philanthropy’s recent 2015 Trends Study, nearly 3 in 5 U.S. family foundations engage younger family members in the foundation — and more than 40% say they expect to add to or increase the number of younger-generation family members on their boards in just the next four years. This is an encouraging trend — especially for those of us who believe that these important institutions can have a much greater impact if they can keep the family productively engaged in their work.

Good governance: How should family foundation boards spend their time?

Posted by Phillip Henderson on February 9, 2016

Checks landing in the mailboxes of nonprofit organizations with foundation return ad-dresses have long been considered philanthropy’s most important currency. Reflecting that view, family foundations have tended to focus their operations, self-image, and their very reasons for being on getting the dollars out the door...Lurking behind that 90 percent, though, is another story—it’s the natural tendency to conflate family governance of a foundation and strategic control of its mission with control of the grantmaking function.

How do we ensure that all family members are heard at our upcoming retreat?

Posted by Karen Green on August 25, 2015

This month we are pleased to feature family foundation consultant and facilitator Karen Green's tips for foundation leaders on engaging retreat participants.

Avoiding avoidance: Addressing and managing conflict in family philanthropy

Posted by Elaine Gast Fawcett on December 15, 2014

Conflict is normal in any family or organization. Yet, many of us avoid conflicts, even if that avoidance affects relationships or how the foundation operates. This month in FGN we feature Part 2 of a two-part series excerpted from our forthcoming Passages Issue Brief on “Avoiding avoidance.” In Part 1 we introduced the nature of conflict and some of the most common conflicts in family philanthropy. In this month's issue we share a variety of healthy tools for calling out and addressing conflict in a healthy, productive way, along with suggestions for when outside help may be needed.

Avoiding avoidance: Addressing and managing conflict in family philanthropy

Posted by Elaine Gast Fawcett on November 18, 2014

Conflict is normal in any family or organization. Yet, many of us avoid conflicts, even if that avoidance affects relationships or how the foundation operates. This month in FGN we feature Part 1 of a two-part series excerpted from our forthcoming Passages Issue Brief on “Avoiding avoidance.” In Part 1 we’ll introduce the nature of conflict and some of the most common conflicts in family philanthropy. Next month, in Part 2, we will share creative “tactics” boards use to perpetuate the avoidance, and how you can use simple tools to call out and address conflict in a healthy, productive way.

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