Posts tagged to 'Difficult decisions'

A Rockefeller Family Foundation Turns Over Some New Leaves

Posted by Lukas Haynes and Michael Quattrone on January 13, 2017

Over the past 18 months, the trustees and staff of the David Rockefeller Fund have embarked on a journey to engage a new generation of family trustees and reinvent a 25 year-old family foundation for a new century of philanthropic challenges.

Philanthropy Supports Democracy, Democracy Supports Us All

Posted by Bruce DeBoskey on December 19, 2016

Results of the recent election season have spotlighted the tremendous divisiveness in our nation – divisiveness that colors our approach to our country, our government and each other.

In 10 Years: More Foundations Aim to Sunset

Posted by Philanthropy Northwest on September 23, 2016

We’ve been hearing more in recent years about foundations opting to give away all their money by a set year instead of existing in perpetuity. In this blog Philanthropy Northwest speaks with Erin Kahn of Raikes Foundation and June Wilson of Quixote Foundation about the trend of private foundations opting to sunset rather than exist in perpetuity.

Failure talks with TPW: A conversation with Sapphira Goradia

Posted by Devon Cohn, Sapphira Goradia and The Philanthropy Workshop on June 14, 2016

This is the first in a series of conversations with members of The Philanthropy Workshop curated by TPW member Devon Cohn. "TPW Talks Failure" examines stories about lessons learned, about the process of failing, and cautionary tales that shine a light into less explored areas or less well understood areas of the philanthropic world. This is a transcript of an interview with Sapphira Goradia, Executive Driector of The Goradia Foundation, which has been edited for clarity.

Expanding your comfort zone: 5 windows into risk in family philanthropy (Passages excerpt)

Posted by Tony Macklin on May 5, 2016

Philanthropy is often described as society’s “risk capital.” Our generosity can support causes and ideas that business and government agencies cannot or will not. We can use our resources to inspire new ideas, challenge existing thinking, or continue supporting an organization when others won’t. However, the idea of risk in philanthropy quickly muddies as we direct our generosity through a family foundation, donor-advised fund, or other collective effort. Our ideas about and tolerance for risk diverge, shaped by individual, family branch, professional, and other experiences.

Lessons from the Orfalea Foundation sunset

Posted by Catherine Brozowski and Lois Mitchell on April 1, 2016

In 2000, The Orfalea Foundation was started in Santa Barbara, California. The foundation carried forward the same entrepreneurial spirit of the business through its philanthropy. Orfalea’s legacy stands for bold and at times even aggressive approaches to helping alleviate some of the pressing social problems in Santa, Barbara, including early childhood education, school nutrition, and disaster preparedness. The foundation engaged in deep working partnerships, comprehensive initiatives, and transformative impact in the community because we believed that through partnerships we could tackle big challenges facing our neighborhoods.

A journey with young philanthropists from the Andrus family: Working with the next gen to animate the principles of social justice

Posted by Alyson Wise on August 25, 2015

On a sunny summer Saturday morning, seven college-aged youth trickled into a collaboration space at the offices of the Surdna Foundation and the Andrus Family Fund to commence the yearlong Board Executives in Training Program (BETS). The organization’s commitment to this work was a long-standing pursuit of the Andrus Family Philanthropy Program (AFPP); for almost fifteen years, it had implemented innovative, inclusive, and flexible programing to engage family members of all ages and interests to get involved in the family’s philanthropies and in public service. BETS itself, had been facilitated previously for four cohorts of youth interested in learning more about the sector and the family legacy.

What's next for the Ford Foundation?

Posted by Darren Walker on July 23, 2015

Last fall, when I wrote about my first year on the job, I asked you all to do something that would be very helpful to me: Tell me the truth. That simple request drew more than 2,000 e-mails to my inbox. Some of them were profound and insightful. Others, lighthearted. But all of them were truthful. And I couldn’t be more grateful. In reading and reflecting on each and every response, I have become more aware of the ways in which we can improve our institution, and serve our mission. Indeed, these last 20-some months have been a transformative journey. Throughout, I have been challenged and humbled. In some cases, my beliefs were affirmed. In others, my assumptions were completely upended. In every instance, your constructive, and sometimes provocative, ideas have stirred, stimulated, and inspired.

Admitting Failure: Learning from mistakes in philanthropy

Posted by Bob Giloth on June 25, 2015

I was recently invited to speak about mistakes and learning in philanthropy at the Grants Managers Network's annual conference. My talk and panel presentation argued that admitting failures contributes to high-quality implementation, innovation of new strategies and improved governance and transparency. It’s good medicine that doesn’t always taste so good. Yet despite increasing philanthropic interest in mistakes and learning, many foundation staff still find it difficult to have conversations about mistakes...

Governance as leadership in tough times

Posted by Alice Buhl on April 15, 2009

For many foundations, establishing the payout level has become fairly perfunctory. The staff or accountants do the math and the foundation pays out the 5% required by law. However, I have worked with foundations that struggle to balance their desires to solve the problems of today and to protect assets...

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