Posts tagged to 'Family conflict'

When the Conversation Moves From the Family Room to the Boardroom

Posted by Virginia Esposito on April 1, 2018

One of the great opportunities of family philanthropy is spending meaningful time with those you love and know well. The challenge of family philanthropy is to avoid the stereotypes and patterns you are used to when you move out of the family room and into the boardroom.

When the Conversation Moves From the Family Room to the Boardroom

Posted by Virginia Esposito on April 1, 2018

One of the great opportunities of family philanthropy is spending meaningful time with those you love and know well. The challenge of family philanthropy is to avoid the stereotypes and patterns you are used to when you move out of the family room and into the boardroom.

Set a New Table, Create a “Safe Zone” for Effective Family Philanthropy

Posted by Bruce DeBoskey on September 21, 2017

Multigenerational family philanthropy creates a unique opportunity for every family to set a new table so that all adult and young adult family members are invited to sit, share, develop and act upon common values and goals around money and philanthropy.

Even with complex histories, families have an opportunity to advance equity

Posted by David Neal on May 3, 2016

Racial diversity and inclusion have been central to the grant making strategy at the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation for decades. In more recent years, the Foundation has deepened its engagement with racial equity. For David L. Neal, a family member and trustee at the Winston-Salem, N.C., family foundation, this focus on equity has been a high priority. Not long ago, however, as he was researching his family’s — and the foundation’s — history, he discovered that its legacy is more complicated than he had once thought.

The 5 Dysfunctions of Philanthropy

Posted by Kris Putnam-Walkerly on January 6, 2016

In 2002, Patrick Lencioni wrote a book called, "The Five Dysfunctions of a Team." It explains the interpersonal aspects of teambuilding in a professional setting and how they undermine success. Although Lencioni’s team is in a fictional company, his lessons also are entirely relevant to grantmakers. We're pleased to share this recent blog post from NCFP Content Partner Putnam Consulting Group on five common dysfunctions that can affect philanthropy generally - and family philanthropy specifically.

How can we prepare for the death of our founder or donor?

Posted by Suzanne Hammer on December 2, 2015

In this month's edition of "Ask the Center," we are pleased to share a guest post from Suzanne Hammer, founder of Hammer and Associates, discussing the recent passing of her father: "In the midst of a loved one dying, there are many decisions to be made. There’s paperwork and Power of Attorneys and property. There’s money. There’s final wishes and figuring out what do with all the “stuff.” In my experience, the stress of it all sometimes divided us more than it brought us together. We all wanted the best for our dad, and we each had strong opinions on what “the best” meant to us."

Trends, transitions and transformation: A triumph of donor family engagement and learning

Posted by Virginia Esposito on October 28, 2015

Enthusiasm, storytelling and terrific weather were all part of the Seattle setting for NCFP’s National Forum on Family Philanthropy. More than 400 registrants and presenters gathered around current themes in effective family grantmaking. What characterizes this program from any other is the overwhelming percentage of trustees and family members. CEOs and those representing other forms of grantmaking – donor advised funds, social venture groups, family office giving and more – fill out the rest of the hallways with colleague to colleague conversations.

Avoiding avoidance: Addressing and managing conflict in family philanthropy

Posted by Elaine Gast Fawcett on December 15, 2014

Conflict is normal in any family or organization. Yet, many of us avoid conflicts, even if that avoidance affects relationships or how the foundation operates. This month in FGN we feature Part 2 of a two-part series excerpted from our forthcoming Passages Issue Brief on “Avoiding avoidance.” In Part 1 we introduced the nature of conflict and some of the most common conflicts in family philanthropy. In this month's issue we share a variety of healthy tools for calling out and addressing conflict in a healthy, productive way, along with suggestions for when outside help may be needed.

Avoiding avoidance: Addressing and managing conflict in family philanthropy

Posted by Elaine Gast Fawcett on November 18, 2014

Conflict is normal in any family or organization. Yet, many of us avoid conflicts, even if that avoidance affects relationships or how the foundation operates. This month in FGN we feature Part 1 of a two-part series excerpted from our forthcoming Passages Issue Brief on “Avoiding avoidance.” In Part 1 we’ll introduce the nature of conflict and some of the most common conflicts in family philanthropy. Next month, in Part 2, we will share creative “tactics” boards use to perpetuate the avoidance, and how you can use simple tools to call out and address conflict in a healthy, productive way.

An invitation to a new peer network for non-family staff

Posted by National Center for Family Philanthropy on January 21, 2014

This month’s “Voices in the Field” comes from the two co-chairs of the new NCFP Non-Family Staff Peer Learning Network: Andrea Sholler, Associate Director of the Tow Foundation in Connecticut, and Sharmila Rao Thakkar, Executive Vice President of the Siragusa Foundation in Chicago....

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