Posts tagged to 'Developing a personal giving identity'

Letting Kids Decide What it Means to Be “Green”

Posted by Ellen Sabin on April 10, 2018

Teaching children the importance of helping others and taking care of the world around them is an essential part of building character. It is also important to encourage children to think about what they want to do to make the world a better place so they can truly understand the power of their actions.

How Are Millennials Different Than Other Donors?

Posted by Brady Josephson on December 26, 2017

Millennials tend to give more frequently, in small amounts, to more causes. And they also want, and expect, more communication about their donation. But beyond that, they want some opportunities to get their hands dirty.

How do we work with our local community foundation to train young philanthropists?

Our family foundation would like to work with the local community foundation to set up a program that will help train younger philanthropists – both those in our family as well as other youth in the community. Do you have suggestions for models that others have used? Indeed we do!...

4 Next Gen Engagement Tips from Ellie Frey Zagel

Posted by Kylie Musolf on November 30, 2017

At the 2017 National Forum on Family Philanthropy, Ellie Frey Zagel described herself as “the next gen of your nightmares: one who said she’d never return to live in the community where her family’s foundation was based.”

Nurturing Lifelong Philanthropy: Inspiring Youth to Share Their Time, Talent, and Treasure

Posted by Jill Gordon on April 11, 2017

Let's take a moment to think about who introduced philanthropic behaviors in your life. Who inspired you to GIVE your time and help others? When did you begin to SERVE those around you? Why are you still ENGAGED in helping youth succeed?

Extending the Invitation: Non-Family Junior Board Members

Posted by Sahar Afrakhan on February 16, 2017

My friends who’ve inherited philanthropy as part of their family life have an amazing opportunity, but there’s little effort to extend an invitation outward. If we can involve our youth, then what’s stopping us?

Not just cute faces: Youth grantmakers are strengthening philanthropy

Posted by Jen Bokoff on June 27, 2016

The stereotype of the “me me me” generation couldn’t be more wrong. Youth are driving grant dollars to organizations that are changing communities through more than 480 programs around the world. Most of these young people are not independently wealthy, and most didn’t say “philanthropist” when asked what they wanted to be when they grew up.

Giving as a family: My family's use of a donor-advised fund through our community foundation

Posted by Rosie Abriam on June 21, 2016

A donor-advised fund (DAF) provides the donor(s) the opportunity to provide a tax-deductible gift to benefit the organizations and issues that the donor(s) care about most. Working with the community foundation has been great for our family because they provide management and support including handling the paperwork attendant to tax-deductions.

The world belongs to our children

Posted by Alan Fox on May 17, 2016

We live in a world of growing income disparities, human rights violations, increasing environmental concerns, political instability and ongoing global threats and atrocities. We will never have an impact on these issues until we enlist the help of those who will be 60 years old in 2071. Yes, I’m talking about the five-year-olds of today.

Giving circles: A tool for engaging youth in giving

Posted by Huong Nguyen- Yap on April 29, 2016

We often hear that young people are the leaders of tomorrow. But what if we started to think about them and support them to be leaders today? What does that mean and how would it look? Philanthropy gives us an opportunity to work with youth on developing life skills such as decision-making, collaboration and, more importantly, empowering youth as leaders in their communities. Engaging youth in philanthropy gives them the ability to make decisions that impact their lives, their communities, and society as a whole.

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