Posts tagged to 'Vulnerable families'

Coming Together: Communities Team Up to Redesign Public Space

Posted by Nicole McGaffey on July 10, 2018

When layered with other community-driven efforts, public art is a powerful vehicle to deepen our connections with one another and to our shared past, present and future. The Mortimer & Mimi Levitt Foundation is dedicated to strengthening the social fabric of America through the power of free, live music.

Social Justice at the Surdna Foundation

Posted by Surdna Foundation on January 16, 2018

The Surdna Foundation recently published, “Social Justice at the Surdna Foundation,” which outlines their commitment to social justice. This has required difficult and ongoing conversations, a broad understanding of long-term systemic change, and acknowledgement that the work will never be "done."

Coming Together: Communities Team Up to Redesign Public Space

Posted by Rounak Maiti on January 10, 2018

Placemaking places people at the heart of its process—empowering individuals by giving them an active voice in shaping the spaces around them, mapping and designing their own communities. The Levitt Foundation highlights a few fascinating placemaking projects from around the globe that illustrate the beauty of people coming together and creating a shared vision for their community.

Look to Your Community Foundation in Times of Crisis

Posted by Exponent Philanthropy and Kristin Laird on December 21, 2017

Everyone wants to help during a crisis, and, for many, that means giving money. But few understand what it takes to distribute funds to the people, businesses, or nonprofits that will create the greatest impact and fulfill the most need—especially if the money lives in different funds at different organizations.

Why Support for Long-term Harvey Recovery is So Vital

Posted by Robert G. Ottenhoff on November 17, 2017

For every day of immediate relief, there are at least ten days required for mid-term recovery and at least 100 days for long-term recovery. Based on that estimate, people will be recovering from hurricane Harvey for at least three years and probably longer.

Foundations Must Speak Up About the Poor and Vulnerable Who Will Be Hurt by GOP Tax Plan

Posted by Claudia Herrold and John Mullaney on November 8, 2017

Too often, people in Washington have the impression that philanthropy can step in to make up for the loss of federal revenue that will occur when steep tax cuts are enacted. We in philanthropy know this is a fallacy of supreme proportions.

6 Ways Family Foundations Can Make A Difference in Immigrant and Refugee Lives

Posted by Naomi Polin on September 27, 2017

With all the changes in the political climate over the past year, I’ve been especially concerned for immigrants and refugees. Many families in my city and community have been affected by the new executive orders and administrative actions, and I’ve read stories about many others across the country that are at risk.

What We Mean by Equity at the William Caspar Graustein Memorial Fund

Posted by David Addams on July 17, 2017

Acknowledging that we are not living in a post-racist or post-poverty environment and learning how and why these issues exist today and continue to interfere with the fulfillment of human potential is a fundamentally key and critical part of the work that we are doing in this exploratory period of our work.

5 Things Funders Can Do to Address the Global Refugee Crisis

Posted by Regine A. Webster on January 19, 2017

As the world faces one of the largest refugee crises since World War II, understanding how to fund effective solutions has proven to be a difficult, complex task.

Stone Soup: Community based advocacy at the William Caspar Graustein Memorial Fund

Posted by Lauren Hasey Maher on February 26, 2014

A Conversation with Nancy Leonard, David Nee, and Carmen Siberon of the William Caspar Graustein Memorial Fund on Community Based Advocacy Children and storytelling have always been at the heart of the William Caspar Graustein Memorial Fund. It is only fitting that one of their most successful...

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