Ginny's Blog Posts

Having new eyes: Transitions in family philanthropy

Posted by Virginia Esposito on February 25, 2015

For more than two years, I have been researching, interviewing, and thinking about transitions in the life of a family philanthropy. I’ve listened to anyone willing to talk to me about their experiences with philanthropic transitions. Occasionally, I have been on the road speaking about my early findings and impressions. I am delighted that my paper, Family Philanthropy Transitions: Possibilities, Problems, and Potential, is the newest addition to our Passages Issue Brief series and can be found in the Family Philanthropy Online Knowledge Center

‘Tis the season to reflect and renew

Posted by Virginia Esposito on December 17, 2014

‘Tis the season …to reflect back on the year and think about what has been accomplished, learned, left undone, and perhaps most brutally, what didn’t work out as planned. I had a hefty bucket of things I wanted to do in 2014.

Family transitions: Yours, mine and ours

Posted by Virginia Esposito on November 19, 2014

Every presentation and family meeting in which I participate invariably turns to transitions. In moments of change – within your family, governance, giving programs, or something else – so much more is affected than just the source of the change. We’ve been experiencing transitions pretty personally here at the National Center for Family Philanthropy.

Renewal: You and your giving

Posted by Virginia Esposito on July 29, 2014

It’s the middle of summer and, hopefully, you’ve taken some vacation time or have a week or more in August blocked out. Our study of family foundation CEOs revealed that few regularly plan vacation. I hope the same is not true of trustees and fund advisors. Given that almost all of you do your...

Valuing family AND strategy – leaders discuss strategic family philanthropy at #ncfp14

Posted by Virginia Esposito on May 28, 2014

I may not be a regular on Twitter, but when it comes to summarizing the first National Forum on Family Philanthropy held in Cambridge, Massachusetts from May 7-9, a sampling of tweets from leading family foundation members, trustees and prominent business, academic and philanthropic leaders who were in...

Welcome to the inaugural National Forum on Family Philanthropy

Posted by Virginia Esposito on April 29, 2014

Here at the National Center for Family Philanthropy, as spring continues to scratch and claw its way to the surface, we are eagerly awaiting and fastidiously preparing for our first-ever National Forum on Family Philanthropy to be held next week in Cambridge, MA. This inaugural Forum on Family...

Four critical elements for generational succession

Posted by Virginia Esposito on February 26, 2014

Dear FGN Readers: The National Center for Family Philanthropy fields hundreds of questions about family giving over the phone, through email, and in person every year.  Thousands more use the Family Philanthropy Online Knowledge Center to search for answers on their own in the thousands of articles,...

Listening, learning, growing

Posted by Kathy Whelpley on January 15, 2014

Dear FGN Readers: Welcome to a new year – here at the National Center for Family Philanthropy, we find ourselves energized and excited about the possibilities of the year ahead. We spent much of the past year listening and reflecting. Listening to giving families about the challenges they face, and...

Reflecting on Mandela’s legacy: Belief in a fundamental concern for others

Posted by Virginia Esposito on December 15, 2013

“A fundamental concern for others in our individual and community lives would go a long way in making the world the better place we so passionately dream of.” – Nelson Mandela Dear FGN Readers: Nelson Mandela’s passing just at the beginning of the holidays helped me to focus on the joy and inspiration...

What Have You Failed at Lately? Please Share it With Me!

Posted by Virginia Esposito on November 15, 2013

As a young program director at the Council on Foundations (some years ago!), my bosses determined I needed less of a direct supervisor and more of a mentor.  Pairing 20-something eager staff members with the wisdom and encouragement of a “senior consultant” was nothing short of genius....

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