Posts tagged to 'Conflict of interest and self-dealing'

Free legal training: Electioneering rules for private foundations and public charities

Posted by Learn Foundation Law on May 13, 2016

Learn Foundation Law is a free resource for online trainings and tools related to the basic legal rules for private foundations.

What is a disqualified person?

Posted by Benjamin T. White on May 15, 2013

Self-dealing is defined to include almost all business and financial transactions between a private foundation and its “disqualified persons.” So what is exactly is a disqualified person? The following is excerpted from the National Center for Family Philanthropy’s Passages Issue Brief, “Avoiding...

Managing relationships with your legal, financial, and investment advisors

Posted by National Center for Family Philanthropy on September 15, 2010

This month’s Ask the Center features answers to questions on managing relationships with your advisors from Patricia Angus, the founder and CEO of Angus Advisory Group, a philanthropy and family governance consulting and educational firm based in New York City. Patricia was a featured speaker on the...

Conflicts of interest: Steering clear of potholes and other bumps in the road

Posted by Anne Etheridge on June 15, 2010

Most family foundations prefer to focus on the business of giving, without having to worry about tripping over the sometimes obscure rules and regulations that govern this work. But the fact is that family foundation boards need to be aware of potential potholes on the road named philanthropy....

Child care and more

Posted by National Center for Family Philanthropy on March 15, 2008

Q: Our foundation’s third generation is coming on the board and some have young children. Some family members say the lack of child care during board meetings hinders participation. Can the foundation pay for child care so that parents can attend board meetings? A: Generally no....

Travel expenses for next generation board members

Posted by National Center for Family Philanthropy on February 15, 2008

Q: We have a next-generation board with five college-age family members who travel from all around the country to meet, review grant proposals, and recommend grants to the governing board. Is it legal to reimburse them for travel expenses? A: Yes. Spouses and children of board members are disqualified...

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