Posts tagged to 'Creating a board'

Adding non-family board members: Q&A with Penelope McPhee of the Arthur M. Blank Family Foundation

Posted by National Center for Family Philanthropy on February 2, 2016

When the Arthur M. Blank Family Foundation added four non-family members to its board, it wanted to bring new perspectives into its meetings, while also promoting the integrity and values of the family and the foundation.

What are some points we should consider as a family foundation seeking a non-family board member?

Posted by Susan Packard Orr on October 28, 2015

In this month's Ask the Center, we feature an excerpt from the newest Passages Issue Brief, "A steadying hand: The critical role of non-family board members," written by NCFP Distinguished Fellow Susan Packard Orr. This special PASSAGES provides insight on the various skills, expertise, and perspectives that a non-family board member can provide, as well as the common challenges for families seeking their first non-family board member, and tips for setting clear expectations for this role.

Can you recommend a short video on family foundation board responsibilities?

Posted by National Center for Family Philanthropy on June 22, 2014

As a matter of fact, we can! We're pleased to share our new video, "So you want to be a family foundation board member," created especially for teenagers and young adults in search of a quick and lighthearted introduction to the many responsibilities of being a family foundation board member:     Also...

Diversity as a Family Affair

Posted by Cole Wilbur on March 23, 2014

What value can diversity bring to the work of family foundations? First of all, diversity is now more interwoven into the fabric of our society, including our neighborhoods, education, business and media. Integrating diversity into many aspects of a family foundation’s work can result in more...

Giving while living: Carolyn and Peter Lynch

Posted by National Center for Family Philanthropy on November 15, 2013

Editor’s Note: The National Center is delighted to partner in 2013 with the Bridgespan Group to share videos from its Conversations with Remarkable Givers series. In this month’s installment, we feature Bridgespan’s interview with Carolyn and Peter Lynch, co-founders of The Lynch Foundation....

Giving while living: Charles Bronfman

Posted by National Center for Family Philanthropy on October 15, 2013

Editor’s Note: The National Center is delighted to partner in 2013 with the Bridgespan Group to share videos from its Conversations with Remarkable Givers series. In this month’s installment, we feature Bridgespan’s interview with Charles Bronfman, son of Seagram Company founder and philanthropist...

What is a disqualified person?

Posted by Benjamin T. White on May 15, 2013

Self-dealing is defined to include almost all business and financial transactions between a private foundation and its “disqualified persons.” So what is exactly is a disqualified person? The following is excerpted from the National Center for Family Philanthropy’s Passages Issue Brief, “Avoiding...

The Changing Face of Philanthropy: Diversity in Family Giving

Posted by Caroline Avery on January 15, 2012

Quick, create a mental picture of a philanthropist. What do you see? An older white man? That’s the picture that pops into most of our heads. And it’s not surprising — this is the dominant image of philanthropy in the United States. From Andrew Carnegie to Warren Buffett, these are the faces of philanthropy most familiar to us.

Family members as staff

Posted by National Center for Family Philanthropy on November 15, 2010

What is the best way to formalize the process of hiring and setting salary for a family member? LIZ WALTERS: Off the top of my head, I can think of four things that we did. The first thing was to create job descriptions. I was the only staff member to begin with, but we also created a job description...

Family involvement: The spectrum of options

Posted by Alice Buhl on October 15, 2010

Kelin Gersick’s book, Generations of Giving: Leadership and Continuity in Family Foundations, outlines the patterns most often seen in family philanthropy. In the first generation the donor has the strongest involvement and control. In the second generation more family members become involved and by...

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