Posts tagged to 'Value of family in philanthropy'

How do we ensure that all family members are heard at our upcoming retreat?

Posted by Karen Green on August 25, 2015

This month we are pleased to feature family foundation consultant and facilitator Karen Green's tips for foundation leaders on engaging retreat participants.

A journey with young philanthropists from the Andrus family: Working with the next gen to animate the principles of social justice

Posted by Alyson Wise on August 25, 2015

On a sunny summer Saturday morning, seven college-aged youth trickled into a collaboration space at the offices of the Surdna Foundation and the Andrus Family Fund to commence the yearlong Board Executives in Training Program (BETS). The organization’s commitment to this work was a long-standing pursuit of the Andrus Family Philanthropy Program (AFPP); for almost fifteen years, it had implemented innovative, inclusive, and flexible programing to engage family members of all ages and interests to get involved in the family’s philanthropies and in public service. BETS itself, had been facilitated previously for four cohorts of youth interested in learning more about the sector and the family legacy.

Learning together with the Hilton Foundation

Posted by Heather Peeler on August 25, 2015

Have you ever been the one tasked with making the plans for a vacation with a large group of people? If so, you know what it is like to juggle many different schedules, preferences and opinions. However, when everyone puts the time and work in and shares the responsibility, it can be a wonderful experience. Coming together to accomplish something results in greater payoff than going at it solo. For the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation, the process of intentionally fostering learning with other organizations is paramount in its grantmaking for just this reason.

The Andrus Family Fund: Weaving a rich tapestry of youth philanthropy

Posted by National Center for Family Philanthropy on July 23, 2015

Editor's note: This month's article features NCFP and Frieda C. Fox Family Foundation's Youth Philanthropy Connect's Igniting the Spark: Examples of Next Gen Engagement Strategies case study on the Andrus Family Fund.

Why is it important to have an internal mission that is separate and distinct from an external mission?

This month we are delighted to feature a question recently asked in our May webinar, Balancing internal vs. external missions in family philanthropy. This in-depth conversation on successful strategies for thoughtfully defining, measuring, and tracking both internal and external missions in family foundation features Julie Fisher Cummings and Doug Bitonti Stewart from the Max M. and Marjorie S. Fisher Foundation and Linda Tracy from the Tracy Family Foundation.

I am Family Philanthropy: William Graustein

Posted by National Center for Family Philanthropy on May 27, 2015

Every day we see committed and generous families making positive impacts on the communities and issues they serve. We want to share their stories and are delighted to announce our new I Am Family Philanthropy video series. Each month, we will share a new compelling profile in their own words. In this month's video, we are delighted to share the reflections of William Graustein of the William Caspar Graustein Memorial Fund.

So many differences, so much in common

Posted by Virginia Esposito on April 22, 2015

Planning for the 2015 National Forum on Family Philanthropy (Seattle, October 14-16) involves a wild ride through all the many interests and choices donor families bring to their giving. Based on evaluations from the 2014 National Forum and all the many topics submitted for consideration for 2015, the range of topics you want to discuss span governance, grantmaking, management, and family dynamics. After culling through the topics in preparation for last week’s meeting of the National Forum Advisory Committee, we know that high on your priority list are impact investing, non-family/community trustees (when, why and how), effective issue collaborations, perpetuity or not (and how does a foundation lifespan choice support your goals for giving and family participation), assessment and evaluation tools, and how do boards and board chairs function at the highest level. We know you want to hear about the grantmaking strategies of creative and risk tolerant donor families. You also want to hear about how family participation – particularly leadership choices and next generation involvement – supports great giving in meaningful ways.

For youth by youth: Family philanthropy from a youth perspective

Posted by Mike Tracy, Isabel Griffith, Justin McAuliffe and Kylie Semel on April 22, 2015

Over the past few weeks, NCFP has been delighted to conduct several very special webinars in partnership with Youth Philanthropy Connect featuring the voice and perspectives of youth philanthropists involved in their family’s foundation. Our first webinar, “Family foundations from a youth perspective,” was held on March 29, 2015 and featured a wide-ranging conversation with four young donors – Kylie Semel of the Frieda C. Fox Family Foundation, Isabel Griffith from the Andrus Family Fund, Justin McAuliffe from the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation, and Mike Tracy from the Tracy Foundation.

Four lessons for effectively engaging youth

Posted by Daniel Horgan on April 22, 2015

I remember my first summer volunteering at the age of 12 for my local YMCA summer camp. Being the youngest of three and seeing my older siblings head off to work each day as camp counselors, I was determined to get in on the action and not be left at home alone. I managed to convince the camp director to let me join the team as a volunteer that supported activities for the 6 year olds. That experience, coupled with many others including serving as a youth representative on a national board and launching a nonprofit at the age of 18, opened my eyes to a number of key lessons on how to effectively engage youth as volunteers, partners, and problem solvers.

Generation Z giving: Philanthropy goes digital

Posted by Susan Crites Price on March 25, 2015

Philanthropy for Generation Z–high school age and younger—is very different from that of previous generations. They won’t be confined to sharing their time, talent, and treasure. Now there’s a fourth T—ties. And along with their ability to connect with peers at home and around the world, they can do it wherever they are. No desk top computers for the “Always On” generation. With smart phones, these kids have the Internet in the palms of their hands—or screens in their jeans, as one wag put it.

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