Posts tagged to 'Family values'

Raising the Next Generation of Givers, Doers, and Helpers

Posted by Beth Nowak on September 12, 2016

Helping others has not only become a significant part of who my children are and what they choose to do, but it now influences how we interact with each other and where we choose to spend our family time together.

From Syria to San Diego: The Lawrence Welk Family Foundation Junior Board Grants $10,000 to Refugee Resettlement

Posted by Kylie Musolf and Lisa Parker on September 9, 2016

A simple internet search for “Syrian refugees” yields millions of results— a testament to how much press coverage and national attention the impact of Syria’s civil war has received in the United States. Lisa Parker, the president of LWFF, saw it as an opportunity for herself and her family to learn about the experiences of refugees when they come to the US.

Looking for the Helpers

Posted by Virginia Esposito on September 7, 2016

My moments of reassurance come when a family funder tells me about a grant or project they’ve launched to restore and reinvigorate community. Often, these are efforts to ameliorate suffering but also to get at root circumstances and causes

Gratitude and humility in philanthropy; from a story, to a value, to action

Posted by Douglas Bitonti Stewart and Julie Fisher Cummings on September 6, 2016

The importance of documenting the ethos of our founders is well known in family philanthropy. Authors and leaders throughout the field have published articles and tools (e.g. Grandparent Legacy Project) aimed to help families ask questions to elicit the core values of our founders. These values are the backbone of our work. And when we are able to connect our founders’ values to real-life stories, it can have a profound impact on our families and those we serve.

Celebrating black philanthropy month and our collective history

Posted by Yvonne L. Moore on August 10, 2016

Philanthropy in this country did not begin with the creation of institutions established by oil and steel magnates, or with savvy investors. The origins and forms are numerous, but for me—a Black woman in America—philanthropy is ancient, personal, inter-generationally nurtured, and, quite honestly, expected.

A change in family dynamics signals a shift away from place-based giving

Posted by Virginia Esposito on July 4, 2016

Today’s philanthropists, however, are likely to be less connected to place. The modern economy is built less on geography and more on technology – and many of those who are earning wealth are doing so in a global marketplace.

Giving as a family: My family's use of a donor-advised fund through our community foundation

Posted by Rosie Abriam on June 21, 2016

A donor-advised fund (DAF) provides the donor(s) the opportunity to provide a tax-deductible gift to benefit the organizations and issues that the donor(s) care about most. Working with the community foundation has been great for our family because they provide management and support including handling the paperwork attendant to tax-deductions.

Helping others embrace the American dream: The A.C. Ratshesky Foundation celebrates 100 years

Posted by Judy Sneath on June 9, 2016

To celebrate his 50th birthday, a Boston-area banker named Abraham "Cap" Ratshesky chose to give a gift to his community by setting aside some of his wealth to create a foundation. A century later, that giving continues.

The world belongs to our children

Posted by Alan Fox on May 17, 2016

We live in a world of growing income disparities, human rights violations, increasing environmental concerns, political instability and ongoing global threats and atrocities. We will never have an impact on these issues until we enlist the help of those who will be 60 years old in 2071. Yes, I’m talking about the five-year-olds of today.

Expanding your comfort zone: 5 windows into risk in family philanthropy (Passages excerpt)

Posted by Tony Macklin on May 5, 2016

Philanthropy is often described as society’s “risk capital.” Our generosity can support causes and ideas that business and government agencies cannot or will not. We can use our resources to inspire new ideas, challenge existing thinking, or continue supporting an organization when others won’t. However, the idea of risk in philanthropy quickly muddies as we direct our generosity through a family foundation, donor-advised fund, or other collective effort. Our ideas about and tolerance for risk diverge, shaped by individual, family branch, professional, and other experiences.

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