Posts tagged to 'Family values'

The Stifler Family Foundation shares their story at the National Forum on Family Philanthropy

Posted on October 28, 2015

On October 14, 2015 at the National Forum on Family Philanthropy in Seattle, WA, Larry Stifler and Mary McFadden, founders of the Stifler Family Foundation, reflect on how their past opportunities influenced their generous giving now. Listen to their story here and follow the National Center for Family Philanthropy on StoryCorps.me.

Planning for an influx of assets

Posted by Elaine Gast Fawcett on August 25, 2015

An influx of assets is a powerful transition point in your family’s philanthropy. With rising resources comes the budding potential to do more of what you’re already doing – or, perhaps, to try something new. Either way, additional resources will often provide your foundation with new options for making a difference according to your foundation’s mission.

A journey with young philanthropists from the Andrus family: Working with the next gen to animate the principles of social justice

Posted by Alyson Wise on August 25, 2015

On a sunny summer Saturday morning, seven college-aged youth trickled into a collaboration space at the offices of the Surdna Foundation and the Andrus Family Fund to commence the yearlong Board Executives in Training Program (BETS). The organization’s commitment to this work was a long-standing pursuit of the Andrus Family Philanthropy Program (AFPP); for almost fifteen years, it had implemented innovative, inclusive, and flexible programing to engage family members of all ages and interests to get involved in the family’s philanthropies and in public service. BETS itself, had been facilitated previously for four cohorts of youth interested in learning more about the sector and the family legacy.

Learning together with the Hilton Foundation

Posted by Heather Peeler on August 25, 2015

Have you ever been the one tasked with making the plans for a vacation with a large group of people? If so, you know what it is like to juggle many different schedules, preferences and opinions. However, when everyone puts the time and work in and shares the responsibility, it can be a wonderful experience. Coming together to accomplish something results in greater payoff than going at it solo. For the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation, the process of intentionally fostering learning with other organizations is paramount in its grantmaking for just this reason.

The Andrus Family Fund: Weaving a rich tapestry of youth philanthropy

Posted by National Center for Family Philanthropy on July 23, 2015

Editor's note: This month's article features NCFP and Frieda C. Fox Family Foundation's Youth Philanthropy Connect's Igniting the Spark: Examples of Next Gen Engagement Strategies case study on the Andrus Family Fund.

Admitting Failure: Learning from mistakes in philanthropy

Posted by Bob Giloth on June 25, 2015

I was recently invited to speak about mistakes and learning in philanthropy at the Grants Managers Network's annual conference. My talk and panel presentation argued that admitting failures contributes to high-quality implementation, innovation of new strategies and improved governance and transparency. It’s good medicine that doesn’t always taste so good. Yet despite increasing philanthropic interest in mistakes and learning, many foundation staff still find it difficult to have conversations about mistakes...

Narrow and Deep

Posted by Jay Ruderman on June 25, 2015

I was once told that “when you’ve seen one foundation, you’ve seen one foundation.” Every foundation, public or private, is different. Each foundation is passionate about the issues they support but the way they “do business” differs vastly. Some foundations solicit applications, distribute funds and this is the extent of their involvement. Others are very private about their funding while some are very public. Since I became President of the Ruderman Family Foundation, I have pursued a path of going “narrow and deep” for the main issue we advocate for: the inclusion of people with disabilities in our society. Twenty percent of the U.S. population has some form of disability and it’s the only minority group almost all of us are guaranteed of joining at some point in our lives...

Why is it important to have an internal mission that is separate and distinct from an external mission?

This month we are delighted to feature a question recently asked in our May webinar, Balancing internal vs. external missions in family philanthropy. This in-depth conversation on successful strategies for thoughtfully defining, measuring, and tracking both internal and external missions in family foundation features Julie Fisher Cummings and Doug Bitonti Stewart from the Max M. and Marjorie S. Fisher Foundation and Linda Tracy from the Tracy Family Foundation.

Ready: Invest! Set: Customize! Go: Impact!

Posted by Adam Simon on May 27, 2015

What would it take to create a core of exceptional leaders equipped with the tools and capacity to be effective change agents, networked to maximize the reverberation of their leadership and committed to doing so for their entire lives? At the Charles and Lynn Schusterman Family Foundation, this question is at the core of our mission to empower young people to make a positive impact in their communities. In all of our focus areas, we create and support initiatives that invest in strengthening the leadership potential of individuals, as we believe the key to solving our most intractable societal issues lies in the strength of the leaders that spearhead such changes.

So many differences, so much in common

Posted by Virginia Esposito on April 22, 2015

Planning for the 2015 National Forum on Family Philanthropy (Seattle, October 14-16) involves a wild ride through all the many interests and choices donor families bring to their giving. Based on evaluations from the 2014 National Forum and all the many topics submitted for consideration for 2015, the range of topics you want to discuss span governance, grantmaking, management, and family dynamics. After culling through the topics in preparation for last week’s meeting of the National Forum Advisory Committee, we know that high on your priority list are impact investing, non-family/community trustees (when, why and how), effective issue collaborations, perpetuity or not (and how does a foundation lifespan choice support your goals for giving and family participation), assessment and evaluation tools, and how do boards and board chairs function at the highest level. We know you want to hear about the grantmaking strategies of creative and risk tolerant donor families. You also want to hear about how family participation – particularly leadership choices and next generation involvement – supports great giving in meaningful ways.

Back to top