Posts tagged to 'Considering Perpetuity'

In 10 Years: More Foundations Aim to Sunset

Posted by Philanthropy Northwest on September 23, 2016

We’ve been hearing more in recent years about foundations opting to give away all their money by a set year instead of existing in perpetuity. In this blog Philanthropy Northwest speaks with Erin Kahn of Raikes Foundation and June Wilson of Quixote Foundation about the trend of private foundations opting to sunset rather than exist in perpetuity.

Free legal training: Electioneering rules for private foundations and public charities

Posted by Learn Foundation Law on May 13, 2016

Learn Foundation Law is a free resource for online trainings and tools related to the basic legal rules for private foundations.

Why the choice to spend down is good for philanthropy

Posted by Virginia Esposito on April 19, 2016

For much of the 20th century, the vast majority of U.S. foundations operated under the idea that they would be in business forever. But as a new generation of family philanthropists take over — and families contemplate just how long forever actually lasts and reflect on the present needs in their communities — a growing number are deciding that they would rather grant their assets during a set period of time than manage their endowments in perpetuity.

The Noyce Foundation: Ten core principles for hands-on philanthropy

Posted by The Noyce Foundation on April 1, 2016

The Noyce Foundation was established in 1990 by the family of the late physicist, inventor, and computer industry pioneer Dr. Robert N. Noyce, co-founder of Fairchild Semiconductor and Intel, and co-inventor of the integrated circuit, better known as the microchip. For the past quarter-century, the Noyce Foundation has been devoted to helping the nation’s students become “curious, thoughtful, and engaged” learners in the fields of mathematics and science. Over its quarter century of existence, the Noyce Foundation’s approach to grant making evolved reflecting what the trustees have learned from their cumulative experiences as well as the institutional knowledge the foundation has gained about the fields it in which it works.

Lessons from the Orfalea Foundation sunset

Posted by Catherine Brozowski and Lois Mitchell on April 1, 2016

In 2000, The Orfalea Foundation was started in Santa Barbara, California. The foundation carried forward the same entrepreneurial spirit of the business through its philanthropy. Orfalea’s legacy stands for bold and at times even aggressive approaches to helping alleviate some of the pressing social problems in Santa, Barbara, including early childhood education, school nutrition, and disaster preparedness. The foundation engaged in deep working partnerships, comprehensive initiatives, and transformative impact in the community because we believed that through partnerships we could tackle big challenges facing our neighborhoods.

Giving while living: Charles Bronfman

Posted by National Center for Family Philanthropy on October 15, 2013

Editor’s Note: The National Center is delighted to partner in 2013 with the Bridgespan Group to share videos from its Conversations with Remarkable Givers series. In this month’s installment, we feature Bridgespan’s interview with Charles Bronfman, son of Seagram Company founder and philanthropist...

Governance as leadership in tough times

Posted by Alice Buhl on April 15, 2009

For many foundations, establishing the payout level has become fairly perfunctory. The staff or accountants do the math and the foundation pays out the 5% required by law. However, I have worked with foundations that struggle to balance their desires to solve the problems of today and to protect assets...

How to Close a Foundation: The Pottruck Family Experience

Posted by Susan Crites Price on April 11, 2009

With a tough economy comes tough decisions. That was true for the Pottruck Family Foundation board, which dissolved the foundation effective Jan. 30, 2009. As their assets shrank in the declining markets of 2008, the family decided that by shifting their philanthropy to a donor-advised fund, they could...

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