Posts tagged to 'Grantmaking guidelines'

How to Walk the Talk When You’re Walking with Others

Posted by Victor Gongora on February 14, 2018

PEAK Grantmaking has been taking a look at how grantmakers can better align their grantmaking practices to their values through our Walk the Talk initiative.

Opening the Door: Is There Any Good Reason Not to Accept Proposals?

Posted by Tate Williams on February 8, 2018

When you look at the common reasons foundations give for not taking applications, they kind of fall apart. At the end of the day, it really just comes down to a choice—a barrier intentionally placed between tax-subsidized wealth, and the public that it’s legally required to benefit.

How Aggravating is Your Grantmaking Process? Use this Checklist to Find Out!

Posted by Vu Le on June 19, 2017

As we roll into 2017, there have been lots of articles about how philanthropy must adapt. Let’s take care of a few logistical things foundations do that make nonprofits want to roll up a printed-out copy of our tax filings and beat themselves unconscious. Funders: Please go through this list one item at a time. Then have a conversation with your team about what things you can do to improve your score.

Funding Community Innovation in Richmond, Virginia

Posted by Robert Dortch on March 23, 2017

We challenged the nonprofit community to think creatively and to take risks. We asked them to take a comprehensive, enduring approach — not a quick fix, but a long-term plan for effective and transformative change.

Eliminating Implicit Bias in Grantmaking Practice

Posted by Nancy Chan and Pam Fischer on December 21, 2016

Some of philanthropy’s core practices may unwittingly be leading funders to perpetuate the inequities they’re trying to eliminate

A Little Mission Creep can be a Good Thing

Posted by Richard Marker on November 14, 2016

There are lots of practical and conceptual reasons to resist mission creep. So then, how can a little mission creep ever be a smart move?

It’s Time for Grantmakers to Embrace Failure

Posted by Katherine Lorenz on October 5, 2016

Philanthropy often encourages grantees to take risks, to be innovative, to find new solutions to old problems. Indeed, many refer to philanthropy as “risk capital,” providing funding that can help society create innovative, new models for addressing the world’s most intractable social issues. But risk and innovation often bring an uncomfortable consequence: failure.

Is there a database for donors to find great grants/nonprofits to fund?

Posted by National Center for Family Philanthropy on August 4, 2016

Every year, our family foundation considers new causes and grantees to support. Since the foundation does not accept unsolicited proposals, the foundation staff would like to know if there is a database or another resource that captures great grantseeker requests for funding. To our knowledge there...

3 ways foundations squash risk-taking

Posted by Kris Putnam-Walkerly on April 26, 2016

There was a time not too long ago when you rarely heard the word “foundation” and “risk” in the same sentence…or paragraph…or entire document. Risk simply hasn’t been something formally and broadly associated with philanthropy over the past few decades. However, it’s become pretty obvious to many people that the traditional ways of grantmaking are not enough to make a dent in the entrenched and intertwined social challenges of poverty, inequity, education or healthcare.

The Brinson Foundation’s commitment to living its values

Posted by Grantmakers for Effective Organizations on April 14, 2016

Since its creation in 2001, The Brinson Foundation has focused in the areas of education and scientific research in order to create a world where all people are valued and committed to improving the world in which we live. As the foundation works to achieve this big goal, it has found that maintaining a strong commitment to its values - such as forming strong, collegial and collaborative relationships with its grantees - is critical to its success and influential in shaping its practices.

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