Posts tagged to 'Strategic planning'

Practicing What They Preach: The Hill-Snowdon Foundation’s Progressive Personnel Policies

Posted by Nat Chioke Williams and Rachel Ogorek on July 16, 2018

"We have learned that it is not just about having progressive personnel policies; an organization should have a work environment that is also supportive of feeding people's passions and their purposes in life."

The Hewlett Foundation Program Officer Term Limits

Posted by Helena Choi on October 12, 2017

The Hewlett Foundation is pretty unique among foundations to set term limits for program staff. Many worry this system creates uncertainty for grantees or loss of institutional knowledge. But I’m convinced that term limits are absolutely great for everyone involved: the person leaving, the foundation, the grantees, and the broader field.

GEO's Change Incubator

Posted by Lori Bartczak on July 18, 2016

GEO’s Change Incubator is designed to help grantmakers strengthen relationships with their grantees in a way that leads to better impact. While GEO’s participating teams are still in the early stages of this work, they have started sharing some of what they are learning and how these lessons can be...

A change in family dynamics signals a shift away from place-based giving

Posted by Virginia Esposito on July 4, 2016

Today’s philanthropists, however, are likely to be less connected to place. The modern economy is built less on geography and more on technology – and many of those who are earning wealth are doing so in a global marketplace.

5 questions to help you align your giving values and practices

Posted by Virginia Esposito on June 1, 2016

Today, the practice of philanthropy is under continuous review – and not just by our critics or those who look suspiciously at big endowments. Those who want the very best for our field and the greatest impact for our work are also looking beyond why we give to examine the how.

Generations Together: Tools for teaching the next generation to give

Posted by Virginia Esposito on March 1, 2016

According to the National Center for Family Philanthropy’s recent 2015 Trends Study, nearly 3 in 5 U.S. family foundations engage younger family members in the foundation — and more than 40% say they expect to add to or increase the number of younger-generation family members on their boards in just the next four years. This is an encouraging trend — especially for those of us who believe that these important institutions can have a much greater impact if they can keep the family productively engaged in their work.

Expanding your comfort zone: Managing risk

Posted by John Bare on September 24, 2015

As I sit here writing about risk, the date at the bottom of my laptop screen – September 11 – is a jarring reminder that risk analysis is both futile and indispensable. It’s futile if we use risk analysis to predict the future. Or come to believe that the act of reflection itself inoculates us against harm. So goes the temptation: Now that we have completed this risk analysis, what could go wrong?

Leveraging social sector leadership: Opportunities for family philanthropy

Posted by Lori Bartczak and Nora Silver on September 24, 2015

While the connection between strong leadership and effective organizations may seem obvious, navigating the variety of ways grantmakers can support leadership can seem overwhelming. In GEO’s recent publication, Leveraging Social Sector Leadership, the authors present research that lifts up what social sector leaders say they need to be successful and how grantmakers can support those needs.

Planning for an influx of assets

Posted by Elaine Gast Fawcett on August 25, 2015

An influx of assets is a powerful transition point in your family’s philanthropy. With rising resources comes the budding potential to do more of what you’re already doing – or, perhaps, to try something new. Either way, additional resources will often provide your foundation with new options for making a difference according to your foundation’s mission.

Learning together with the Hilton Foundation

Posted by Heather Peeler on August 25, 2015

Have you ever been the one tasked with making the plans for a vacation with a large group of people? If so, you know what it is like to juggle many different schedules, preferences and opinions. However, when everyone puts the time and work in and shares the responsibility, it can be a wonderful experience. Coming together to accomplish something results in greater payoff than going at it solo. For the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation, the process of intentionally fostering learning with other organizations is paramount in its grantmaking for just this reason.

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