Posts tagged to 'Ethics'

Nurturing Relationships with Transparency

Posted by Richard Russell and Richard Woo on September 28, 2017

Transparency is a powerful force when used appropriately. The trick is deciding what is “appropriate” across a wide range of contacts and interactions. In our prior blog posts, we shared our experience cultivating transparency through the lens of finding balance and sharing knowledge. This time around, we want to concentrate on ways to harness transparency for mutual benefit.

Speech to United States Conference of Mayors

Posted by La June Montgomery Tabron on September 14, 2017

W.K. Kellogg Foundation President and CEO La June Montgomery Tabron delivered the following speech on The Kellogg Foundation’s framework for Truth, Racial Healing & Transformation (TRHT). This framework can help drive cities and communities forward and it will support the comprehensive equity agenda that the United States Conference of Mayors created.

A Statement on Charlottesville by the Surdna Foundation

Posted by Phillip Henderson on August 29, 2017

This past year, we have seen political and social norms challenged and often trampled. We have struggled to keep our bearings and hold to our moral principles. As we have been inundated by the constant barrage of events, media firestorms, and tweets, a tragic and horrible day in Charlottesville provides a chilling moment of clarity and outrage.

Uncovering the Layers of Unconscious Bias is the Journey of a Lifetime

Posted by June Wilson on June 21, 2017

In this piece, June Wilson, Executive Director emeritus of the Quixote Foundation, reflects on the value of uncovering and examining unconscious bias, shining the light on how other funders can do the same.

Funders’ Role in Protecting Marginalized Communities During the Next Four Years

Posted by Vu Le on March 8, 2017

An insidious result of injustice is that it isolates us from one another, and it allows those of us not directly affected to intellectualize, to think about it in the abstract. To combat it, we must be intentional about listening to those most affected, and we must make time to reconnect with and recommit to one another, even before taking action.

Transparency, Privacy, and Trust: Finding Balance for Family Foundations

Posted by Richard Russell and Richard Woo on February 27, 2017

As a group, family philanthropies put a lot of energy into connecting with our constituents. We do this joyfully because we know that strong, trusting relationships are vital to our success and the communities we serve.

Why Your Board Chair Needs a Job Description

Posted by Virginia Esposito on February 2, 2017

Successful family foundation board chairs are able to both drive action and manage egos — and are often the difference between a foundation deftly navigating challenging situations and being tripped up by them.

Philanthropy Supports Democracy, Democracy Supports Us All

Posted by Bruce DeBoskey on December 19, 2016

Results of the recent election season have spotlighted the tremendous divisiveness in our nation – divisiveness that colors our approach to our country, our government and each other.

Ethics and family philanthropy

Posted by Richard Gunderman on August 18, 2016

Private property exists, Aristotle asserts, at least in large part to enable us to be generous. If we did not possess things – goods, money, and the right to direct our own labor – then we would not be in a position to choose to give. Furthermore, when a gift is freely given and received, says Aristotle, it opens up opportunities for friendship and community among people.

Even with complex histories, families have an opportunity to advance equity

Posted by David Neal on May 3, 2016

Racial diversity and inclusion have been central to the grant making strategy at the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation for decades. In more recent years, the Foundation has deepened its engagement with racial equity. For David L. Neal, a family member and trustee at the Winston-Salem, N.C., family foundation, this focus on equity has been a high priority. Not long ago, however, as he was researching his family’s — and the foundation’s — history, he discovered that its legacy is more complicated than he had once thought.

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